Taadmit

Synonyms: 
Queue Fine de l'Ouest (=Thin-Tailed of the West, in Tunisia)
Special Characteristics: 
This breed is hardy and well adapted to the stressful environment of the coastal area; it is tall, long-legged and a good walker; it is fairly resistant to heat, drought and transient low nutrition. Rams are horned and ewes are polled (Mason, 1967; Mason 1996).
Main Location: 
The Tadmit sheep are declining in Algeria but are found all over the country in Tunisia in Zones free of St. John's Wort (Hypericum Perforatum) which produces photosensitivity, but chiefly in the region of Le Kef, Les Baksour and the high plateaux. Flocks of 200-300 head, including about 5% of rams, graze in semi-desert ranges and high tablelands with seasonal migration to lower grounds (Mason, 1967).
Origin: 
This breed was developed in Algeria through genetic selection from from the local Algerian Arab (Ouled Nail type) sheep starting from 1925 at the Tadmit experimental sheep breeding station, located between Djelfa and Laghouat in the south of the high plateaux of the country. Because a few Merino rams were introduced into this area between 1850 and 1860, it is possible that their blood is also present in the Tadmit. This breed is now found in Algeria as well as the adjacent areas of west Tunisia (Mason, 1967).
Species: